Performance Review — Here’s How to Nail Your Input2020-08-15T14:23:36+00:00

Performance Review — Here’s How to Nail Your Input

 Guest blog by Carla D. Bass published by recruiter.com

 

“Provide me input for your performance review” People cringe at the boss’ request.

It’s an onePerformance reviews and pencils needed to craft your submissionrous chore many abhor. Why? First, writing about yourself seems like bragging. Second, information you provide affects your promotion potential and future career opportunities. Third, you wonder, “What the heck did I do since the last review?” Fourth, your input is space-constrained, so each word matters! Finally, the coups de grace to this distasteful task, you are probably compiling the information under a time suspense – “Input by tomorrow, please.” –

 

Not to worry! Follow these 10 tips to compose a powerful submission reflecting your hard work and noteworthy contributions.

1. Pretend You’re Describing Someone Else. Banish thoughts about bragging! Pretend you are making a case to promote someone else – a colleague, subordinate, or friend. Examine your contributions objectively and factually. What did you do? How did you move the ball forward? Proudly claim credit for what you achieved. Now is not the time to be humble.

2. Gather the Data. Like an investigative reporter, dig for the details of your accomplishments. The following questions will help reveal this information:

  • What is your level of responsibility?
  • Do you supervise anyone?
  • Did you submit subordinates for awards, honors, etc.? (Claim credit — this is hallmark of fine leadership!)
  • Did you resolve a difficult situation?
  • What is the monetary value of equip for which you are responsible?
  • Did you save resources? How and what, exactly?
  • Did you work on a significant project? What was its duration and impact?
  • Did you demonstrate initiative?
  • How did you advance the mission?

 3. Record Accomplishments as They Occur. Keep a job journal. Be precise in recording what you did, for whom, and the resulting impact. If your organization has a Weekly Activity Report, contribute regularly and retain your submissions. These practices ensure you don’t overlook significant events. It also precludes that frantic, angst-filled, retrospective search wondering, “What did I do this past year?” as you strive to meet the deadline your boss imposed.

4. Scope the Story. Infuse your input with detail to add depth, dimension, and context, and make the story pop! Detail constitutes a mental yardstick, enabling readers to grasp the significance of your contributions. Quantify by addressing how many, how soon, accomplished ahead of schedule (by how much), finished under budget (by how much), or improved production (by what percent), etc.

  • “Mary processed many job applications” is flat contrasted with, “Mary processed 54 job applications this month alone, twice the office average, and three times that of her peers.”
  • “Named Salesman of the Month” sounds good but is more impressive when relayed as, “Named Salesman of the Month, selected over 95 peers for the third time this year.”
  • “Managed a team studying the continued viability of an aging computer system and provided recommendations to the CEO” tells a completely different story when revised to, “Managed a 9-person team in a 5-week study of an aging computer system. Made 6 recommendations; CEO accepted them all; saved $850 K annually.”

5. Highlight Accolades. Maintain a list of your awards and other recognition, such as time-off bonuses, kudos from your boss or clients, letters of commendation, and other forms of positive feedback. For record purposes, identify the source by official title and the date of the accolade. An email file can help capture this information. Depending on the magnitude of the compliment, consider including a short, concise quote in your submission. These golden nuggets are terrific bell ringers. Nominations submitted for your awards, by definition, contain valuable information on your accomplishments. Get a copy!

6. Strategize Subliminal Messages. Leverage words that connote “selection.” Differentiators such as chosen, garnered, selected, agency-wide, named as, and nominated for convey a subtle but powerful message highlighting you as an exemplary employee. “The CEO personally selected Jane to lead his star program” contains three differentiators: CEO, personally selected, and star program.

7. Prioritize and Triage Your Input. Performance reviews are usually space constrained. Once you’ve compiled the information, triage it — some probably won’t make the cut. Criteria below can help with these decisions. Was the accomplishment:

  • Completed early or under budget?
  • Ground-breaking?
  • Recognized as a new benchmark?
  • A demonstration of excellent leadership
  • Visible to upper echelons of your organization? To other organizations?
  • Far-reaching in its impact?

8. Hook the Reader. Opening words are critical, setting the tone for the compelling, fact-based information to follow. The hooks below herald a strong message … “Pay attention. This individual is remarkable!”:

  • Personifies innovative leadership …
  • Propelled her office to unparalleled levels …
  • Best at showcasing his people’s talents …
  • Tireless efforts this year resulted in …
  • His top three of many significant achievements …
  • Has contagious leadership we need …
  • Brilliant, contagious enthusiasm led to…
  • By force of personality, led her division …
  • Not one to rest on her laurels, she continuously
  • A standout at motivating people …

9. Retain the Reader’s Attention. Avoid verbs such as responsible for, supported, contributed to, assisted with, which convey little meaning and prompt the question, “What precisely did you do?” Instead, describe your actions with crisp, powerful verbs such as:

  • Created a critical program …
  • Directed development of …
  • Executed budget of …
  • Pounced on extra funds when it became available …
  • Launched a prototype …
  • Broke new ground …
  • Ensured 4-day conference was perfectly executed …
  • Expertly arranged …
  • Set new benchmarks …
  • Brokered arrangements with …
  • Impervious to stress, met the twin challenges of …
  • Personally commended by …

10. Leave Them Wanting More! Closing words constitute the reader’s final impression. Select them to end with a bang!

  • Her proactive, can-do attitude is contagious
  • Sets high standards and her people achieve them
  • A superior performer by any measure of merit
  • Count on her delivering where precedents are non-existent
  • Strong leader, outstanding manager, and a top-flight technician
  • Guarantees peerless performance in a most demanding assignment
  • Place in positions to influence others

“Provide me input for your performance review.” This is an opportunity to shine! You are your own best advocate. Own your success by claiming credit for jobs well done. Convey them powerfully by making each word count and every second of the reader’s time play to your advantage … and you’re well on the way to achieving that standout performance review.